The Gasoline Engine and the Fourth Industrial Revolution – Challenges and Opportunities

The Gasoline Engine and the Fourth Industrial Revolution – Challenges and Opportunities
03 March 2020

The Gasoline Engine and the Fourth Industrial Revolution – Challenges and Opportunities

A blog by Dr. Richard Osborne, Global Technical Expert

With an urgent requirement to de-fossilise transportation, there is an impetus for us all to achieve the most cost-effective benefits from electrification.

Policy makers have given particular priority to making the transport sector zero carbon as soon as possible. OEMs are being challenged to reduce emissions, bring their products to market faster, but with reduced budgets for research and development.

We believe that net zero greenhouse gas emissions will require a more holistic view of total lifecycle impacts and sustainability, and a more risk-mitigated approach is that meeting transport greenhouse gas goals will require a systems approach: comprising efficiency, utilisation, defossilisation and an integrated multi-energy vector energy system. Future air quality emissions regulations and utility limitations for battery electric systems will ensure that the combustion engine operating on defossilised fuels will remain a key element of automotive and industrial propulsion systems for many decades, as forecast by many sources.

In this era of rapid vehicle electrification, what part will the gasoline engine play in the future passenger car powertrain portfolio?

The electrification of powertrains provides an opportunity to alter the way the engines are designed to help boost efficiency and reduce emissions.

At the Future Powertrain Conference 4&5 March 2020, as part of my address on the Gasoline Engine and the Fourth Industrial Revolution – challenges and opportunities, I am discussing dedicated hybrid engines, which we believe enable maximum system efficiency with the lowest cost and complexity.

In the Magma xEV project Ricardo has worked with a global OEM to evaluate an advanced combustion system for series hybrid application. The project goal objective was 45% brake thermal efficiency, and key enablers are very high compression ratio, long stroke architecture, and advanced ignition and knock mitigation technologies. The combustion concept has been developed using virtual product development approaches, and validated with a single-cylinder research engine.

Watch the Magma xEV webinar here

To discuss how our benefits and offerings can help you with your electrified platform challenges, please meet me at the Future Powertrain Conference on 4 March 2020 or contact me: info@ricardo.com